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Total solar eclipse: IU experts available to comment

We are less than a week from a total solar eclipse, which occurs when the moon passes directly between the sun and the earth, placing the earth in its shadow. This takes place on April 8, 2024, and several Indiana cities will be in the path of totality – Including five IU campuses.

Those cities will experience roughly four minutes of darkness, revealing planets and stars that aren’t typically visible during the day. The natural phenomenon is also a massive tourism draw for communities along the path, and robust planning is underway across Indiana University’s campuses. 

IU experts are available to comment on what happens during total eclipses and how the public can view the events safely.

For more information, contact Teresa Mackin at tmackin@iu.edu or 317-274-5432, or Barbara Brosher at bbrosher@iu.edu or 812-855-1175.

Daniel Beverly
IU Bloomington

Daniel Beverly

O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs

Daniel Beverly is a Postdoctoral Research fellow at the O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University Bloomington. He can speak to the impact of an eclipse on plants.

Expertise

Plant ecophysiology, ecohydrology, soil moisture, eclipse impact on plants

Hin Cheung
IU Bloomington

Hin Cheung

IU School of Optometry

Dr. Hin Cheung is a clinical assistant professor at the Indiana University School of Optometry. He can speak about how to protect your eyes when it comes to viewing eclipses and how to find safe and legitimate eye protection.

Expertise

Eclipse eye safety, glaucoma, retinal imaging.

Andy Gavrin
IUPUI

Andy Gavrin

School of Science, Department of Physics

Andrew D. Gavrin, chair of the Department of Physics on IU’s Indianapolis campus, can discuss magnetic materials, physics education, and general physics and astronomy. On April 8, he will be facilitating eclipse observation on the front lawn of the Indiana State Museum. 

Expertise

Educational technology, education research, physics teaching, magnetic materials.

Jerry Hinnefeld
IU South Bend

Jerry Hinnefeld

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Chancellor’s Professor Emeritus Jerry Hinnefeld is a nuclear physicist, managing director for the IU South Bend Astronomical Observatory and frequent host for IU South Bend’s “Meet the Stars” public observing events. For many years he taught a physics course on energy and climate for non-science majors.

Expertise

Astronomy, astrophysics, nuclear physics, physics of energy and climate.

Jennifer Guiliano
IUPUI

Jennifer Guiliano

Department of History, School of Liberal Arts

Jennifer Guiliano is a white academic living and working on the lands of the Myaamia/Miami, Pokagon Band of Potawatomi, Wea and Shawnee peoples. She is a professor in the Department of History and affiliated faculty in both Native American and Indigenous studies and American studies at IUPUI.

Expertise

Mascots, sports, American history, Indigenous history, Native Americans, digital humanities, digital history, digital culture.

Cody Kirkpatrick
IU Bloomington

Cody Kirkpatrick

Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Cody Kirkpatrick is a senior lecturer in atmospheric science at IU Bloomington. He conducts research and teaches courses in weather and weather forecasting, with primary interests in thunderstorms and the extreme phenomena they produce. He can speak about the weather forecasts leading up to the eclipse and how clouds may play a role in viewing the eclipse.

Expertise

Meteorology/atmospheric science, weather forecasting, atmospheric hazards, severe weather, tornadoes, hurricanes, winter weather, mid-latitude cyclones, blizzards, heavy rainfall, climate and climate change, climate trends in severe weather.

Patrick Motl
IU Kokomo

Patrick Motl

School of Sciences

Patrick Motl is a professor of physics and associate dean in the School of Sciences at IU Kokomo and director of the IU Kokomo Observatory. His research focuses on the study of compact objects through numerical simulations.

Expertise

Astronomy, physics, astrophysics, compact objects, neutron stars, white dwarves, black hole mergers.

Daniel Neely
IUPUI

Daniel Neely

IU School of Medicine

Dr. Daniel Neely is a professor of ophthalmology at the IU School of Medicine. He is an international expert in the field of pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus, or misalignment of the eyes. He can speak about how to protect your eyes and eye safety during an eclipse.

Expertise

Eclipse eye safety, pediatric ophthalmology, amblyopia, pediatric cataracts and intraocular lens implants, pediatric glaucoma.

Catherine Pilachowski
IU Bloomington

Catherine Pilachowski

Department of Astronomy

Distinguished Professor Catherine Pilachowski holds the Daniel Kirkwood Chair in Astronomy at IU Bloomington, where she teaches and conducts research on the evolution of stars and the chemical history of the Milky Way galaxy from studies of chemical composition of stars and star clusters. 

Expertise

Astronomy, stellar compositions, star clusters, star formation, the origin of the elements in the Milky Way, stellar seismology.

Edward Rhoads
IUPUI

Edward Rhoads

School of Science

Edward Rhoads is a lecturer in physics at IU Indianapolis. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Minnesota, and his bachelor’s degree in physics and astronomy from the University of Washington.

Expertise

Astronomy, physics, eclipse.

Kimberly Rosvall
IU Bloomington

Kimberly Rosvall

The College of Arts and Sciences, Biology

Kimberly Rosvall is an associate professor in the department of biology in The College of Arts and Sciences at Indiana University Bloomington. She can speak to animal behavior before, during, and after an eclipse. She is also affiliated with IU’s internationally-recognized Program in Animal Behavior. Rosvall’s overarching research goal is to understand behavior in wild animals and why it varies within and among species.

Expertise

animal behavior, bird, hormones, aggression, climate change, heat, eclipse, genomics, evolution, behavioral ecology

Henry Scott
IU South Bend

Henry Scott

Department of Physics and Astronomy

Henry Scott is a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at IU South Bend. He is a geophysicist who studies the deep interiors of planets, via applications of experimental high-pressure mineral physics. He is especially interested in ice-rich moons and their potential for harboring life.

Expertise

Geophysics, landscape evolution, meteorology, mineralogy, natural hazards, physics, planetary science.

Patrice Tankam
IU Bloomington

Patrice Tankam

School of Optometry

Patrice Tankam joined the IU School of Optometry as an assistant professor in 2017. His research and teaching activities involve the physics of light and its interaction with biological tissues and specifically the eye. His research primarily focuses on developing novel imaging technologies to facilitate the understanding, diagnosis and management of eye diseases in both animal models and humans, research that has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and the industry.

Expertise

Optical engineering, optical coherence tomography, microscopy, anterior segment imaging, optical design.

Jessica Warren
IU Northwest

Jessica Warren

College of Arts and Sciences

Jessica Warren is a lecturer in physics and astronomy at Indiana University Northwest. Her current research interests are science (particularly physics) education and investigations of light pollution. She is also active in science outreach.

Expertise

General physics, astronomy.

Wes Tobin
IU East

Wes Tobin

School of Natural Science and Mathematics

Wes Tobin is an assistant professor of physics. His research interests include observational astronomy, including the areas of observations and analyses of peculiar velocity structures in galaxy clusters; spectroscopic observations of parent stars of extrasolar planets; and high-precision photometric methods in detecting variability and extrasolar planets.

Expertise

Observational astronomy in the areas of peculiar velocity structures in galaxy clusters and high-precision variable star photometry; educational research in the physical sciences in the areas of pedagogical methods including corequisite/concurrent enrollment strategies; online and technological methods of instruction using NROC, OER, QM, PhET, and statistical modeling and analysis.

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