Take a look inside the LuddyFest celebration honoring Luddy Hall

The Indiana University School of Informatics, Computing and Engineering held a weeklong celebration starting April 9 in honor of Luddy Hall, the new 124,000-square-foot, $39.8 million home to most of the school's departments and programs.

LuddyFest included a lecture series from global innovators; a student startup pitch contest; demonstrations of maker spaces and workshops; an unveiling ceremony for "Amatria," a large, high-tech, sculptural work of art suspended from beneath the glass atrium on the fourth floor; and a dedication ceremony led by IU President Michael A. McRobbie.

Take a look at some of the highlights from the celebration:

From top: The exterior of Luddy Hall, the new 124,000-square-foot, $39.8 million home to the Indiana University School of Informatics, Computing and Engineering on the IU Bloomington campus; Sean Wang, dean of the School of Computer Science at Fudan University in Shanghai, China, shakes hands with a guest; students, faculty and staff visit Luddy Hall during the weeklong celebration.  Photos by Eric Rudd and James Brosher, IU Communications

From top: Tingyu Li, left, and Pavithra Ramamurthy pitch their "Buddy" speech therapy robot for children with cleft lip and palate. The team won first prize and $7,500 at the third annual Cheng Wu Innovation Challenge; keynote speaker and IU alumnus Ian Rogers, the former senior director of Apple Music and the chief digital officer of LVMH, speaks to a crowd; engineering student Aiden Whelan, left, holds a headset as he demonstrates an interactive creation during the FabLab Showcase.  Photos by Ann Schertz, Eric Rudd and James Brosher

From top: The audience begins to fill in before the unveiling of "Amatria," a piece of "living art" designed by world-renowned Canadian architect Philip Beesley; a student speaks with an alumnus after a roundtable discussion; Toronto artists Luke Kimmerer, left, and Richard Mui work on the installation of "Amatria" leading up to LuddyFest. Photos by Amelia Herrick and James Brosher, IU Communications.