Around IU Bloomington

IU Bloomington ranked a 'best value' school

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IU Bloomington ranked No. 13 as a "best value" among U.S. colleges and universities. Photo by James Brosher, Indiana University

Indiana University Bloomington ranked No. 13 as a "best value" among U.S. colleges and universities in the Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education College Rankings for 2019.

This year, for the first time, the rankings included a calculation of which schools among the top 250 overall provide the best value for their cost. The value rankings were calculated by dividing each school's overall score by its average net price, including tuition, fees, room and board.

IU Bloomington had the second-highest best value score among the 14 schools in the Big Ten conference. Topping the best value list were Berea College, a liberal arts college in Kentucky; the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and the University of Washington, Seattle.

IU Kelley School of Business announces largest class of Fry scholars

Marking a 10th anniversary, IU's Kelley School of Business has announced its largest class of William R. Fry Scholars, with 32 incoming freshmen selected.

Entering freshmen who applied to IU and were directly admitted to the Kelley School were eligible. Preference is given to students who are traditionally underrepresented in the field of business.

Students receive funding toward standard tuition and fees. They also receive support in the form of an advisor and a Kelley student mentor during their time at IU. They also have the option of residing in the Kelley Living Learning Center, a residential program that focuses on personal, academic and professional development. Each program has its unique events.

The Fry Scholars program is made possible through a $15 million gift in 2008 from the late William R. Fry, a Kelley alumnus. The gift and resulting program are helping the Kelley School pursue a major initiative toward more inclusiveness and increased enrollment of underrepresented minorities. When making the gift, Fry said that he especially liked the impact that his Kelley School gift would have on young minds.

A full list of the year's Fry Scholars, their high schools and their hometowns is available on the Kelley School of Business's Go From Moment to Momentum blog.

Hamilton honored by Bipartisan Policy Center

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Lee Hamilton. Photo by James Brosher, Indiana University

Former U.S. representative and current Indiana University faculty member Lee Hamilton received the Patriot Award from the Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington, D.C., organization that combines Democratic and Republican ideas to promote health, security and opportunity.

The award was presented Sept. 11, commemorating the anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the United States 17 years earlier. Hamilton shared the award with Thomas Kean, former governor of New Jersey. Kean was chairman and Hamilton vice chairman of the nation's 9/11 Commission.

Hamilton is a distinguished scholar in the IU School of Global and International Studies and a professor of practice in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at IU Bloomington.

Campus among top contributors to Teach for America

IU Bloomington is one of the top contributors to Teach for America's 2018 corps, according to data released by the organization. With 28 graduates joining the corps, IU Bloomington ranks in the top 20 among large universities.

Established in 1990, Teach for America recruits recent college graduates to teach in urban and low-income schools. Corps members take part in an intensive summer training program and commit to teaching for at least two years.

IU Bloomington to celebrates National Hispanic Heritage Month with films, speakers, discussions

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IU Bloomington's Latino Cultural Center, La Casa.

IU will celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month, Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, with a series of events, films and discussions that highlight the histories and cultural accomplishments of Latino and Hispanic Americans.

Held during the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua, and in celebration of the independence day in Chile and Mexico, National Hispanic Heritage Month celebrates the heritage and culture of Hispanic and Latino Americans and honors their contributions to the United States.

A central space for the celebrations throughout National Hispanic Heritage Month is IU Bloomington's Latino Cultural Center, or La Casa. Celebrating its 45th anniversary in the 2018-19 academic year, La Casa will offer programming that brings discussions of Latino culture to campus and marks the decades of impact the culture has had on the IU Bloomington community.

IU researchers awarded NSF grant to enhance student learning in humanities

Learning history at the college level involves not just memorizing facts but making and defending arguments about historical events and their causes and results. But how can students develop those skills as they encounter new material in large lecture classes?

A team of IU Bloomington faculty members is tackling the challenge by creating software that will help students make and analyze historical connections as they work through readings and assignments. Funded with a two-year, $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, the Net.Create project will develop ways to use network analysis to support learning in the humanities.

Kalani Craig, clinical assistant professor of history in the College of Arts and Sciences and co-director of IU Bloomington's Institute for Digital Arts and Humanities, is principal investigator for the project. Also working on the project are Joshua Danish, associate professor of learning sciences, and Cindy Hmelo-Silver, the Barbara B. Jacobs Chair and professor of learning sciences, both in the School of Education; and Ann McCranie, assistant director of research administration in the IU Network Science Institute.