Around IUPUI

'Ask Aaron' webinar host urges continued vigilance with COVID-19 safety measures

Positive rates for COVID-19 on the IUPUI campus are low, and the overall trend continues downward, Dr. Aaron Carroll said during the March 17 "Ask Aaron" webinar. But he cautions students, staff and faculty to not let their guard down.

"The pandemic is not over," said Carroll, one of the leaders of IU's COVID-19 Medical Response Team. "We're still trying to keep this thing in check. We're doing pretty well, but we all need to still be vigilant."

The campus community needs to continue wearing masks, practicing physical distancing, avoiding large gatherings and getting vaccinated when eligible, he said.

Carroll hosts weekly "Ask Aaron" webinars for faculty, staff and students to ask questions about the virus and the university's efforts to combat it. The next webinar for all campuses is March 31.

Additional webinars are planned throughout the semester. Those unable to tune in live can watch the recordings at broadcast.iu.edu.

For information about the COVID-19 vaccine, and who can receive it and when, visit IU's COVID-19 vaccine website.

Chancellor's Student Advisory Board looking for new members

The Office of the Chancellor is looking for eight Jaguars to join the student advisory board. These students will be a consistent student voice for Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar and campus leadership, reflecting the diversity of experiences and backgrounds of our undergraduate population.

Applications are due by 11:59 p.m. March 28. Candidates must be full-time undergraduate degree-seeking students and must have at least a 3.0 cumulative IUPUI GPA with good standing in academic and personal conduct. Board members serve a one-year term, which would begin with the fall 2021 semester and conclude at the end of the spring 2022 semester.

Making online teaching more engaging

Across the IU campuses, instructors are always reaching out for new ways to engage students and make their classes more effective. Join the discussion in the Continuing the Conversation webinar series.

The final two sessions in the series will take place at 1 p.m. and highlight tools and technologies that focus on student engagement:

  • March 26: Using Social Annotation to Support Learning and Improve Engagement in Online Contexts
    • Christopher D. Andrews, associate instructor, counseling and educational psychology, and Ph.D. candidate, Learning Sciences program, School of Education, Bloomington.
    • Grant T. Chartrand, research assistant, Center for Research on Learning and Technology, and Ph.D. student, Learning Sciences program, School of Education, Bloomington.
  • April 16: Leveraging Google Drive to Enhance Student Learning
    • Andrew Bunger, lecturer, professional and computer skills, Department of Communication, Kelley School of Business, Bloomington.
    • Angela Perry, senior lecturer, professional and computer skills, Department of Communication, Kelley School of Business, Bloomington.

Learn more and register at the IU Online faculty website, Teaching Online at IU. You'll receive an email with instructions for accessing the webinars.

For any questions, contact Gina Londino-Smolar at glondino@iupui.edu.

Diversifying occupational therapy through theater

Occupational therapists use meaningful activities to promote health. But when the majority of the profession is composed of white women, can it adequately meet the needs of a diverse population? That's the question IUPUI's Sally Wasmuth is tackling through a new project supported by IU's Racial Justice Research Fund.

Wasmuth and her team are having important conversations about promoting equity in occupational therapy and developing action steps to diversify the field. Their aim is to change the landscape of occupational therapy, and in doing so, diversify health care in the United States.

The virtual live reading and moderated discussion will take place at 8 p.m. March 25, and registration is encouraged.

Read more about Wasmuth's research on the Research Impact website.

Religious studies associate professor wins two awards

Associate professor of religious studies Rachel Wheeler recently earned two awards for her research titled "Singing Box 331: Re-sounding Eighteenth-Century Mohican Hymns from the Moravian Archives" after it was published in the William and Mary Quarterly.

Wheeler and her co-author won the Heizer Award from the American Society for Ethnohistory and the Lester J. Cappon Award for the best article in the William and Mary Quarterly.